Batman: A Telltale Games Series Episode 1 Review

Check out our full playthrough of this episode here

This is a new take on Batman. It’s not the camp man in tights from the Adam West Days, it’s not the brutal and tormented Ben Affleck Batman, it’s not even plastic nipples Batman. If anything Telltale’s take on Batman is probably closest to the ‘constantly in a moral dilemma’ Christian Bale Batman of the Nolan films. As you can tell, we’re much more fans of the movie Batman universes than the comic books or even the animated series, but it’s refreshing to see that Telltale haven’t tried too hard to imitate just one source, but instead they’ve come out with their own, and we love it.

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This is a Telltale game through and through, but as with the Lego games, each new game seems to have refined the formula and improved upon it, even if the basic elements are instantly recognisable. You still get to wander around a little bit looking at things, you have to make snap dialogue decisions that have an effect on what happens later, there’s some action sequences (more on these later) and there’s the occasional super serious binary decision that’s going to define a lot of what happens in future episodes. All of this is similar to what Telltale started with their Walking Dead series, but there’s much less of the annoying filler material (walking around huge areas with nothing to do until you find the right trigger) and the good bits, like the agonising decisions, have survived intact.

The action is worthy of note with this entry. It wouldn’t be Batman without at least a little combat and this episode definitely delivers. We would like a little more choice in how brutal you choose to be (that’s a big part of some of the best decision making in this episode) as Batman often tends towards his ‘this would definitely kill a person but it’s Batman so we’ll pretend it didn’t’ style of combat favoured in the Arkham games. Goons get smashed against stone walls and get heavy things hurled at their head, but then later it’s a serious decision about whether to break someone’s arm or not. We like different takes on Batman and we enjoy both the ‘attempts at being a pacifist’ Batman you sometimes see in the comics, and the ‘basically a psycho’ Batman from the recent Ben Affleck adaptation, but it feels like Telltale are trying to get the best of both worlds and that’s one of our biggest gripes with the game, even though in the end it’s really quite a minor one.

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The quicktime events are much harder than they have been previously, but they’re also quite forgiving in that you can mess up loads without having to start over. If you get a series of them correct in a row then you get to do a fancy finishing move at the end of the sequence. We haven’t seen what happens if you mess them up yet, but we’re guessing Batman just doesn’t quite come across as the badass he should be. Thankfully a lot of the more irritating quick time events like having to rapidly push a button have been done away with completely. Another slight improvement is how the prompts are sometimes slightly incorporated into the scene, so buttons are attached to something. We’re big fans of having in-game HUDs, like in Dead Space or Splinter Cell Blacklist, it’s something we wish more games would take note of.

The story in this first episode is definitely gripping and introduces some familiar faces in interesting new ways, but the ridiculous amount of exposition does begin to grate if you can’t laugh along with it. The death of the Waynes is talked about literally every ten minutes, to the point where you wonder why anyone hangs out with Bruce at all, literally every conversation he has ends up with him talking about his dead parents. With the slight comic book stylings and suspension of disbelief you always need to enjoy anything related to Batman, you can look past this as an entertaining quirk, but once the story really gets going it’s annoying to get bogged down with the game telling you things you already know over and over again. It’s a little like how the young versions of villains are introduced in the current Gotham TV series. “Look this girl likes plants. Her name is Ivy, she’s a bit scary, but she likes plants. Look at all her plants. Get it? GET IT?” Anyone at all familiar with the Batman universe (and who’s not at this point) will feel a little patronised by some of the dialogue, but it’s fine and the good conversations and choices that Telltale excels at more than make up for it.

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Overall we’re really excited that Telltale have managed to create an interesting and unique story within the Batman universe and we can’t wait to play more. The engine is improved, the good bits are just as good as they ever were, and a lot of the pacing problems that plagued the Walking Dead and Game of Thrones games seems to have been fixed. Here’s to more Batman!

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